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20120926
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you make about his appearance? >> he is trying to restart a conversation about the economy that is focused on barack obama. he was supposed to be doing the same thing but got sidetracked and badly by this video. he will be ablepresident to get over this. he has to hope that is not the majority of people. the fact that a majority of people do not approve of how barack obama has handled the economy, but ultimately those people will say i am done with a guy who is currently in office. let's give the other guy a chance. the interview he has done and he is going to continue to do all of those things are an attempt to shift the conversation. good >> even republicans have said he is running and in that campaign. -- an inept campaign. he is trying to suggest he took responsibility for these comments. did you see thus splitting hairs? >> i agree with that. they blame the campaign. we did the post mortem on the hillary clinton campaign, and the conclusion was that her campaign did not serve her. ultimately it is the job of the candidate. the candidate is the one that puts a person in
, and the economy will be front and center. what are the important economic numbers to listen for? >> susie: and metro p.c.s. says "hello" to t-mobile, in a merger that will make t-mobile the fourth largest wireless carrier in the country. >> tom: that and more tonight on "n.b.r."! >> susie: private sector hiring was surprisingly perky in september. that's according to data out just two days before the government's crucial and more complete monthly jobs report. payroll processor a.d.p. said employers added 162,000 jobs last month, stronger than expected. but the pace is slowing, and numbers for july and august were revised lower. still, there are signs the job market is improving, but no where close to replenishing the jobs lost in the great recession. suzanne pratt reports. >> reporter: few things would make more americans happy than a healthy job market. from recent college grads to president obama, their future might look more certain if companies really ramped up hiring. economists say there's too much uncertainty on the horizon for that to happen any time soon. the good news is that fi
all out in september, a hopeful sign that the u.s. economy may be picking up. >> tom: i'm tom hudson. ben bernanke defends his strategy at the federal reserve to do more to help the economy. >> susie: and how technology is making it possible for doctors to go paperless. >> tom: that and more tonight on "n.b.r."! >> susie: the first day of the new quarter, kicks off with a blue chip rally. investors were encouraged by a report showing that ameran report showing that american s ctoriewere busy in september.or a popular index of national factory activity rose to 51.5 last month, from 49.6 in august. it was the fastest pace of production since may. but that upbeat news was overshadowed by comments from federal reserve chief ben bernanke, saying the economy is not growing fast enough to bring down the unemployment rate. we'll have more on that in a moment. those two events led to volatile trading here on wall street. the dow rose about 78 points, but was up as much as 155 points earlier. the nasdaq drifted in and out of positive and negative territory, finally losing more than 2.5 points,
on it to ease its mounting losses. the u.s. economy shows more signs of slowing, and slowing down faster than expected. but silver has been red hot. where is the demand coming from and can it last? we talk with phil baker, the c.e.o. of hecla mining. that and more tonight on nbr! we begin with discouraging news about the sluggish economy. by the broadest measurement, economic growth slowed sharply in the second quarter. the gross domestic product was revised considerably lower today. growth was 1.3% in the april through june period. just a month ago, the estimate was 1.7%. add that to a big drop in purchases of big ticket items, like washing machines and furniture. in august, durable goods orders fell 13.2%, and you've got an economy that's just muddling along. but one ray of encouragement-- fewer people filed for unemployment benefits for the firsme claims fell by6, 20 to their6, july lows of 359,000 claims. on wall street, the dow jumped 72 points, the nasdaq added almost 43 points, the s&p up 13. while the u.s. continues working through problems left over by the great recession, there are
debate looms, 40 days to go as the candidates drill down on the economy. >> you think if we spend another $5 trillion on tax cuts for the wealthiest americans, all our problems are going to go away? >> his plan is the spluss, how did the first one go. how much of it did you get? it was cash for clunkers. did you get help from that? gwen: and duke it on foreign policy. >> i'm pretty certain there will be bumps in the road because in a lot of these places, the one organizing brell has been islam. >> he said the developments in the middle east are bumps in the road. [laughter] >> yeah, that was my reaction. bumps in the road? these are not bumps in the road. these are human lives. gwen: the candidates, the polls, the issues, the voters, we are in the heartland tonight. covering the week, charles babington of the associated press, nia-malika henderson of the "washington post." jim tankersley of "national journal" and jeff delaney of the "new york times." >> this is a special election 2012 edition of "washington week with gwen ifill and national jol"naur. public fding for "washington week" in
, as the presidential candidates focus on the economy, what do the mixed signals mean? we get perspective from two economists. >> woodruff: then, we go on board navy ships in the persian gulf to watch a massive military exercise aimed at securing the strait of hormuz. >> we need to be prepared to deal with mines go in the water. this exercise is focused on the mine trip and demonstrating our able to clear mines. we have to be able to do that. >> suarez: the chinese communist party ousts a once-powerful politician and prepares to unveil its new leadership. margaret warner has our update. >> woodruff: mark shields and david brooks analyze the weeks news. >> suarez: and from our "american graduate" series, we take an encore look at the story of an eighth grader who turns to journalism to tackle violence in his middle school. >> if i didn't have a-- i would probably be let up with the wrong people and doing the wrong stuff. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> bnsf and carnegie corporation. >> and with the ongoing support o
are really pretty slack, and for government to withdraw support from the economy as the tories have done since 2010 has really been a recipe for a double dip recession and sure enough we have got one. >> you actually have got an interesting case study, america is a much bigger economy than the uk but our two countries were dealing with the financial crisis more or less in the same way. >> yes. >> a new government came in, not just austerity but masochism that is being -- >> by each other --. there is masochism in the uk with respect to the economic, a collector austerity around europe which is related, a separate point. >> the uk laboratory has been used to test the thesis that by contracting government spending you presto expand private enterprise. it hasn't worked and that way we ended up with a simple national -- >> why is that? >> because the private sector is not spending, sitting on 750 billion pounds of cash and not investing, consumers have their wits frightened out of them, export markets are slack, presto, if all of the indicators are point manager the wrong direction you have
to become the sixth largest economy. perhaps it is no wonder that the british prime minister has come to town to drum up trade. he is leading a delegation and in the past few hours, he met with the president in the capital. but brazil faces many challenges. there are signs that its economic growth is slowing and inflation is on the rise. when it comes to education, brazil ranks 53rd in the world. it is an issue the country needs to addss so it can seize its momentum not be left on the sideline. and downtown, there are throwing up the buildings at a dizzying pace. but it takes more than muscle to lift the country. all of this prosperity was built on natural resources but of the country wants to do more than supply commodities to china, it needs human helped to. >> you will not find many skilled workers on the streets. it is here in the poor neighborhoods, not far from the business district, that you find that challenge. if this country ever wants to develop from an emerging economy, it is going to have to do a better job educating its population. gdp but the six largest and blow in edu
by the us treasury said it is preparing to act to protect the economy. >> if investors get any sense that there might be a failure, they'll all race for the exit. and that's the equivalent of a run on the bank and there is no one there-- no one like a parent with capital or the fdic to supply capital if there's that kind of race for the exit. >> reporter: three options are on the table. instead of a fixed value of $1, money market funds could be required to use a floating value. regulators are also considering whether money market fund companies should hold some of their assets as a buffer against a surge in withdrawals or whether to require investors to wait before they can get back a portion of their money. the s.e.c. could try again to pass new rules, but if it doesn't, the stability council could decide some big money market funds need closer regulation. that idea worries fund companies. >> it would result in significantly more costs and regulation and who would want to invest in a fund that the federal government has designated as systemically important? >> reporter: new rules m
's minister of economy and finance. but he is not exactly a politician. as a respected economist considered to be above party politics he was chosen to form a new technocratic government. it put him at the center of the european debt crisis confronting rising interest rates that led to greece, ireland, and portugal to seek bailouts. his ability to turn calamity into opportunity has revived his nickname "super mario." i have pleased to have him here at this table for the first time. welcome. >> delighted to be here. >> rose: i see that you have said that you're not going to run for prime minister? >> no, i can confirm that i will not be a candidate. i believe i couldn't even be a candidate because, as you mentioned, i am senator for life. so candidates are candidates inn order to become members of parliament. >> rose: and you're senator for life. >> yes. >> rose: do you want to stay as prime minister? >> of course i will not. i will-- the whole government will have to resign when the elections take place, probably next-- after that, it will be for the political parties, depending on the outc
. on tonight's "newshour." major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> woodruff: israel's prime minister warned again today that iran is well on its way to creating a nuclear weapon and said the world needs to act. benjamin netanyahu spoke at the united nations. as he has often before, netanyahu condemned iran and its nuclear program, and called on other leaders to do the same. >> at stake is not merely the future of my country. at stake is the future of the world. and nothing could imperil our common future more than the arming of iran with nuclear weapons. >> woodruff: the israeli prime minister said the hour is, quote, "getting late
been provided by: moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> brown: three months after upholding president obama's health care law, the supreme court is back with a docket that may even rival last year's term for drama. the justices will decide a case on affirmative action in higher education, and are expected to take up disputes on same-sex marriage, civil rights law, and more. the term opened today with arguments in another controversial case: whether businesses can be sued in u.s. courts for human rights violations that occur in foreign countries. marcia coyle of the "national law journal" was in the courtroom this morning, and is back with us tonight. welcome back. >> nice to be back. brown: let us stipulate, as the lawyers say, that last year was a blockbuster. >> absolutely. brown: new this term has some potential
would not describe it as an economic collapse. i think the economy is too big and there are too many interests for it to collapse this easily. obviously, the economic situation is deteriorating. it is very clear that different factors have worked together, coincided at this stage, for this situation to be this critical. >> one of the things that the president has been discussing is economic sanctions. something he has denied which has any impact on the past. >> it is very convenient for him. in the past, basically, he wanted to make the argument that sanctions are not working. right now, while everyone else is blaming the government, and especially the president, for the current situation, he is blaming the sanctions. this is one way of diverting attention. >> who do the majority of the iranians claim? >> we don't have any accurate polls. it is very difficult to have a genuine opinion poll. my gut feeling says if they are very nuanced. they understand that the sanctions are having an effect. they understand that there are other domestic issues both the political and economic nature.
and are now eager to spend it on new homes on signs the overall economy is improving. but that increased demand has brought more competition for lots. >> now you have end users who are buying for themselves, you have other builders who are doing spec homes, so lot prices have gone up significantly in the last ten months. >> reporter: new home prices are also rising. the commerce department said last month alone they were up more than 11%. but while this is all good news for an economy that hasn't had much of it lately, morningstar economist robert johnson says the market still has to make up a lot of lost ground. >> if you look at housing starts at the peak we were over two million starts. i'd say based on population the number should have been about a million and a half. now we're down around 750,000 in terms of housing starts so we're kind of half of what i view as normal. >> reporter: one wild card for builders is the ongoing uncertainty about the bush tax cuts. subkowiak says if those tax cuts aren't extended some potential buyers could put a hold on buying a new house. diane eastabr
the economy. to what extent are the low rates motivating consumers to spend? >> i frankly don't buy that too much. i think there's a problem because you hurt people's interest income, and people with interest income could spend more, and the problem is people aren't able to access the low rates. you need a very high credit score to get the low rates and everybody that can access the low rates has done it, and if the rates were higher banks wouldn't require as high of a credit score. they're selling what they can through fany and fedy freddie. it's about credit scores and not interest rates. >> susie: aside from what banks are doing. what has to change, to change consumer attitudes about spending? >> the economy has to get better. we've had this in the summer for the past two or three years in a row, and every economy rebounds. if we're going to have a rebound in the holiday season, that could be great and help to put people back to work, and allow them to spend a little bit more freely. we also have a long holiday season. november starts out on a thursday, which means thanksgiving comes earl
billion. it is europe's largest -- fourth largest economy. gavin hewitt has more from madrid. >> lines of police outside the education ministry in madrid tonight. teachers protested here against cuts. they came onto the street at the government's announced the most severe round of budget savings so far. these latest austerity measures are widely seen as paving the way for a full-scale bailout. >> [spending -- speaking spanish] >> the minister of finance said he heard 2012 would be the last year the economy would shrink. another minister described it as a crisis budget designed to exit the crisis. this austerity budget aims to find savings of 40 billion joerres next year. each government department would how to make cuts of 90%. public-sector pay will be frozen for another year, and the retirement age is set to rise. >> just a few weeks ago, europe believed it had achieved a breakthrough. the european central bank said it would help come -- countries like spain by buying their bonds and reducing their borrowing costs. but there was a catch, spain would have to apply for a rescue and it
on the number one issue for most voters this year: the economy. joining us for the debate, and here with us now to preview what to expect tonight are two familiar faces syndicated columnist mark shields and "new york times" columnist david brooks. gentlemen, welcome. the night is finally here. mark, no pressure, just 60 million people will be watching. what are you looking for from tonighta encounter? >> what i'm looking for, judy, is that the-- the candidate who understands of the two that the most important thing is not making a mistake but really making a point as to what his presidency would be about. i think both of them are geared because so much has been-- attention has been directed to gaffes in the past that affected or influenced, shamed the outcome, that impression. it's a magic moment. with no pundits, no prism of edtorm columnists, 60 million individuals sit down in a comparative situation, they make their own assessment. and i think it's a marvelous public exercise. >> woodruff: a magic moment, david? >> we'll see. it is the biggest night of the election. usually the debates have
globalizations as an opportunity. they want an open society, an open economy, a society where you tolerate and respect people, a different faiths and cultures and then the closed minded who really have a view that if you don't accept my view then are you an alien or an enemy. i think that is the battle that is going on and in the end, i think it's important always, and i always say this to people in america to realize-- realize that for all the pictures of extremist that you see in people burning the american flag and protesting and so on, you also then have a lot of people who wanted same type of society and free society that we want. >> rose: has the is palestinian-israeli situation gotten off the front burner for too long and you can bring it back? >> well, it's a good question. not for the people out in the region, by the way. >> rose: it has not gotten off the front burner. >> no, i still believe that it's central to the future of the region. look, i have just come back from my last-- it was my 88th visit there. my wife said to me it is not actually the number of visits you made, it's
are concerned, at the economy, how we avoid what has happened already, how we avoid falling into another recession, around those issues, what ought to be debated wednesday night? >> they should be challenged about whether we want a sustainable financial system. will both presidents appoint people to their economic team who will see the economic interest of the people probably? -- broadly? will they appoint regulators who will be independent of wall street? will they support them when they need to make decisions? will this president protect regulators when congress tries to beat up on them? did they recognize the crucial connection between our economic growth and prosperity? tavis: if you were going to appoint regulators and others not connected to wall street without looking for names, where would you look for those types of people? whenever you talk about financial issues, the people who in-depth writing these institutions -- to end up running these institutions, they always seem to come from the same pool of choices. >> it is bipartisan, republicans and democrats, on the hill, the regu
. our economy is stuck in a recovery that is clearly deserves the name. our national debt has risen to record levels. our military tested by a decade of war is facing cuts based to that -- thanks to the budgetary games played by the white house. our values have been misunderstood by a president who thinks that weakness will win favor with our adversaries. by failing to maintain the elements of our influence and by stepping away from our allies, president obama has heightened the prospect of conflict and instability. he does not understand that an american policy that letses rult can provoke a precedent and encouraged this order." two paris. let me take them one at a time. in the first paragraph, he speaks to the way he sees the economic conditions in its country. what did mitt romney say in that first paragraph that you disagree with, including the budgetary games the white house has played? what he said on the domestic front that you disagree with? anything? >> i am disagreed with everything he wrote. that's easy, tavis. look, one thing we might agree with is that the recovery is n
. >> they are the ones who own the businesses and they are the ones who are putting the money back in the economy and providing the jobs so i believe you know that would be a better plan for us. >> woodruff: 24-year-old athletic trainer sarah abrams also voted for mr. obama. but this time around, she says she's undecided. >> i'm not sure yet. i'm still like you know like watching and basically researching so i'll make my decision soon. >> woodruff: o.s.u. senior krystina hollowell says she identifies with the republican party, but has more liberal views on social issues than candidate mitt romney. do you know how you are going to vote yet? >> no, to be honest, i really don't. i'm more of i like lean towards republican but then socially i'm romney is like very against like abortions and like birth control and that type of stuff for like women and same with like gay marriages. i'm more towards like obama's plan. >> woodruff: in fact, peter levine, director of the center for information and research on civic learning and engagement at tufts university says one set of issues that could hurt romney wi
. four years later in a down economy it looks like his challenge will be even greater. >> woodruff: and we talk with national public radio's greg allen. he focuses on the outreach to hispanics in the tar heel state. >> ifill: then margaret warner updates the investigation into the assault on the u.s. consulate in libya. >> woodruff: we look at new findings showing australia's great barrier reef has lost half its coral in the last 27 years. >> ifill: and we close with snapshots of three of this year's macarthur genius award winners, each with a unique view of war. >> people tend to look at the military, they tend to look at war and they tend to look at conflict as something very black and white. it's not like that at all. >> ifill: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: creating new enriching experiences. through intel's philosophy of "invest you for the future" we're helping bring these new capabilities to market. we're investing billions of dollars in r&d around the globe to have the heart of tomorrow's innovations. by inve
nesome parts of this nation but at the end of the day, women care about the economy, jobs and government spending and they will capture the vote on some of those issues. >> we have consensus. i think it will motivate the base which i think is a strategy of the republican party but it won't close the gap. >> we are all in agreement. this won't make or break the election of the romney/ryan ticket. it's about the economy and other issues that are more important. >> if it's supposed to -- and you're right, it's a base motivator but if it's supposed to be a base motivator and the polls show romney really falling behind at this point, is it going to help? >> i don't finish she falling behind. there are so many polls out there that you can look at. but it really -- >> most recent abc news, washington post, and those kind of polls have shown us is that activityically significant gap and in the battle ground states, it's even worse like in ohio. all of a sudden they were neck-and-neck and a few months ago, romney was ahead and obama is 6 or 7 points ahead. >> you have to look at enthusiasm in tho
evidence that international sanctions over tehran's nuclear program are damaging the economy. now to the presidential race here in the u.s. and both mitt romney and barack obama are busy swatting up and rehearsing for the first television debate this wednesday. polls show the republican candidate is trailing president obama in the crucial swing states. one of them is of course ohio where early voting gets under way tomorrow. from there our north america editor reports. >> ♪ the boys are back in town ♪ >> the boys are indeed back in town yet again. they call this the buckeye state for the men who are fighting for the white house it's a state to suck up to, whether it's buying the local produce. >> i'm thinking we are going to be eating some corn over the weekend. >> or urging minors to phone a friend. >> want you to find one person to convince to vote for our ticket. >> both candidates are well aware in the last election in the last 44 years ohio has voted for the winning candidate so the politicians woo voters. >> we can create one million new manufacturing jobs in the next f
aid. >> we can employ people for a time, but can't sustain the economy for a long term. it can't pull the whole cart, because at some point the money runs out. an assistance program that helps unleash free enterprise can create enduring prosperity. >> the calls at the u.n. for outlawing offensive speech produces strong defenses of such speech not only by president obama but also from leaders in the american muslim community. i want to explore that with kim lawton managing editor of the program and the director of the muslim office of the public affairs council. welcome to you both. >> thank you. >> how are you american muslims trying it to persuade other muslims around the world that putting any kind of limit on free speech is dangerous? >> well, i think the first way we're trying to convince fellow m muslims of this is the fact that the idea of free speech is a foundational part of the koran itself. we don't only believe in terms of americans and our belief in the constitution, but the koran challenges folks to engage in dialogue and in discourse. it challenges people of the same fai
the mid-'90s, it was a disaster in the economy of russia. >> rose: you were a financial expert. >> and you know like it was the station where, like different companies in the cities they were on the verge of dying. >> rose: right. >> and we were young, ambitious, risky and we were not afraid of nothing. so we bought a very bad enterprise. >> rose: you made a big bet? >> yes, because at the time we did our best in order to find partners abroad. nobody came because it was too risky. we spent a lot of money, we spent a lot of hours, two and three hours a day, now we can show that this, for example, entity are one of the most profitable entities in the field production of nickel and platinum and palladium. but it was risky at the time because we have debt, more than one year to know the company. can't imagine this. and in the far north people they have no opportunity to receive salary for more than a half year. it was like really a disaster. it was a great disaster. and really we're very proud. >> rose: with so much at stake it all together was not necessarily safe, either. >> it wasn't safe a
to the situation we're in right now with the economy? how are they going to solve the deficit problem and also increase job creation?" and i'd like to hear that explained clearly, because they have two very different philosophies. third, i think that if the debates do their job, we're going to be able to answer the question, "what are the sacrifices either one is going to ask us to make?" >> such as reforming social security, medicare, higher taxes, lower taxes? >> yes. and on the table are all sorts of things that many people value a great deal and we may not be able to afford anymore. so should we have deductibility for second home mortgages? should we have deductibility for high-cost homes? should we have health insurance coverage provided by employers continue to be deductible? if so, for whom, should it be for all? and should we raise the age of entitlement, if so, to what level?" when someone says that about social programs, i want to also hear the answer to the question, "what are you doing with military spending? and how do you justify the tradeoff? we've gotta get the revenue someplac
Search Results 0 to 32 of about 33 (some duplicates have been removed)

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